Foppery?

Nerdy deeds, done dirt cheap.

182 notes

nprfreshair:

Today Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell. Corrigan says the novel gives readers “the chance to step out of time for a while and into a world richer and stranger than most of us could imagine.” 
She encourages readers to try The Bone Clocks, even if fantasy fiction isn’t your cup of tea: 

"David Mitchell is one of those writers I’d follow anywhere—even deep into (what is for me) the often-exasperating genre of fantasy fiction.  I don’t naturally gravitate to tales about alternative universes, wormholes, or tribbles; but, there are always exceptions and if Mitchell feels like trying out a semi-futuristic vehicle about immortal soul stealers, I’m willing to take a deep breath, step aboard, and say, in the words of Rod Serling: “Next stop, the Twilight Zone.” 
As in Cloud Atlas and some of his lesser-known novels, Mitchell’s new book, called The Bone Clocks, is elaborately constructed, jumping around in time and narrative perspective.  A friend of mine, who’s also a Mitchell enthusiast, rightly says that his novels are “postmodernist without all the pretentious metaphysics.”  What my friend means is that Mitchell’s technical wizardry is there, not for show, but in service to his themes and characters—he’s a deeply compassionate writer.   In fact, despite its experimental edge, the main reason to read The Bone Clocks is an old-fashioned one:  the draw of a charismatic character named Holly Sykes.”


This book sounds really interesting, but I don’t know if I can tell people I’m reading “The Bone Clocks” with a straight face. >.>

nprfreshair:

Today Fresh Air book critic Maureen Corrigan reviews The Bone Clocks by David Mitchell. Corrigan says the novel gives readers “the chance to step out of time for a while and into a world richer and stranger than most of us could imagine.” 

She encourages readers to try The Bone Clocks, even if fantasy fiction isn’t your cup of tea: 

"David Mitchell is one of those writers I’d follow anywhere—even deep into (what is for me) the often-exasperating genre of fantasy fiction.  I don’t naturally gravitate to tales about alternative universes, wormholes, or tribbles; but, there are always exceptions and if Mitchell feels like trying out a semi-futuristic vehicle about immortal soul stealers, I’m willing to take a deep breath, step aboard, and say, in the words of Rod Serling: “Next stop, the Twilight Zone.” 

As in Cloud Atlas and some of his lesser-known novels, Mitchell’s new book, called The Bone Clocks, is elaborately constructed, jumping around in time and narrative perspective.  A friend of mine, who’s also a Mitchell enthusiast, rightly says that his novels are “postmodernist without all the pretentious metaphysics.”  What my friend means is that Mitchell’s technical wizardry is there, not for show, but in service to his themes and characters—he’s a deeply compassionate writer.   In fact, despite its experimental edge, the main reason to read The Bone Clocks is an old-fashioned one:  the draw of a charismatic character named Holly Sykes.”

This book sounds really interesting, but I don’t know if I can tell people I’m reading “The Bone Clocks” with a straight face. >.>

0 notes

I love nights like this. The air has a bit of crispness to it, and that means I can walk to the corner store and not come back sweating. :) #urbanite

I love nights like this. The air has a bit of crispness to it, and that means I can walk to the corner store and not come back sweating. :) #urbanite

160 notes

70sscifiart:

"Spaceships travelling at many times the speed of light; humanoids meeting, greeting, shooting and loving other beings, their tentacles and eye-stalks swaying in the breeze; characters with unpronounceable names speaking wistfully in the midnight brightness of twin moons; these are just some of the ridiculous scenarios I’ve always scoffed at in science fiction. (I’ve always preferred earth-bound nightmares about the future.) Nonetheless, I’ve just read three of Iain M. Banks’ Culture novels – which are full of this sort of thing – back-to-back and this post will try to explain why."
Here’s an interesting essay on space opera for people who don’t like space opera: "The Delights of Deep Space"
[Inconspicuous Creation]

70sscifiart:

"Spaceships travelling at many times the speed of light; humanoids meeting, greeting, shooting and loving other beings, their tentacles and eye-stalks swaying in the breeze; characters with unpronounceable names speaking wistfully in the midnight brightness of twin moons; these are just some of the ridiculous scenarios I’ve always scoffed at in science fiction. (I’ve always preferred earth-bound nightmares about the future.) Nonetheless, I’ve just read three of Iain M. Banks’ Culture novels – which are full of this sort of thing – back-to-back and this post will try to explain why."

Here’s an interesting essay on space opera for people who don’t like space opera: "The Delights of Deep Space"

[Inconspicuous Creation]